Gender Identity Dissorder – Symptoms

Gender Identity Dissorder
Crossdresser Crossdressing transvestitism Transsexualism

Abstract [Full Text] [PDF]

 

Abstract

Definition
Gender identity disorder is a persistent feelings that your body is a different gender than your mind. It is a sense of inappropriateness of one’s anatomic sex.

Boys with gender identity disorder see themselves as girls and vice versa. This is distinct from homosexuality — people with gender identity disorder may be attracted to the same or the opposite sex, but they feel that their own biological sex is “wrong” and doesn’t represent their true gender identity.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
People with gender identity disorder act and present themselves as members of the opposite sex. The disorder affects self-concept, choice of sexual partners, and the display of femininity or masculinity through mannerisms, behavior, and dress.

The feeling of being in the body of the “wrong” gender must persist for at least 2 years for this diagnosis to be made. The cause is unknown, but hormonal influences in the womb, genetics, and environmental factors (such as parenting) are suspected to be involved. The disorder may occur in children or adults, and is rare.

Symptoms

Children: express the desire to be the opposite sex have disgust with their own genitals believe that they will grow up to become the opposite sex are rejected by their peer group, feel isolated have depression have anxiety

Adults: desire to live as a person of the opposite sex
wish to be rid of their own genitals
dress in a way that is typical of the opposite sex
have depression
feel isolated
have anxiety

Either adults or children: withdrawal from social interaction
cross-dressing, clothing habits are typical of the opposite sex
Signs and tests
A history and psychological examination confirms the persistent desire to be the opposite sex. The person’s partner choices may be same-sex or opposite sex.
Treatment
Individual and family counseling is recommended for children, and individual or couples therapy is recommended for adults. Sex reassignment through surgery and hormonal therapy is an option, but often severe problems persist after this form of treatment.
Expectations (prognosis)
A better outcome is associated with the early diagnosis and treatment of this disorder.
Complications
poor self concept
social isolation
emotional distress
depression or anxiety

 

Calling your health care provider

Make an appointment with your health care provider if you observe the symptoms of this disorder and desire help, especially with anxiety and depression.